People are buying a heartburn drug that is being tested as a coronavirus treatment

People are buying a heartburn drug that is being tested as a coronavirus treatment
People are buying a heartburn drug that is being tested as a coronavirus treatment, which can cause deficiency

America: The active ingredient in many heartburn drugs is being studied as a possible treatment for coronavirus, which may lead to a shortage of popular brands of heartburn in major US pharmacies.

Dr. Kevin Tracy reported that Femidid and antihistamines, the Femotidine found under the Pepsiid AC brand and other generics, are being used in a trial by Northwell Health researchers in the New York City area.

Despite the fact that Tracy urged people not to go out and stock up on heartburn drugs, retailers like Amazon and Walgreens were already facing shortages.

On Amazon, the three common options found through the Pepsid AC brand and a search were either unavailable or out of stock until Monday afternoon. The company did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

At CVS, the largest US pharmacy chain famotidine, either in pepsid or generic form, was removed in most locations in New York, according to its website. Searches from Los Angeles, Chicago, Houston and other cities yielded similar results, with most locations out of stock. The company did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Walgreens seemed to be in the same bind as CVS, stock-out notices in most Business Insider-searched locations across the United States with zip codes and a few stores showing limited stock. The company did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Tracy said that it was yet to be known whether corotidine would be useful in the treatment of coronavirus patients. Even if some benefits are found, patients in the study are being taken intravenously in large amounts, much more than it would offend anyone.

"You should not go to the pharmacy and take heartburn medicine," he told CNN.

The journal Science reported on Sunday that researchers had struggled to keep the study silent for fear of possible execution of the drugs.

"If we talked about this with the wrong people or very soon, the supply of medicines would be gone," Dr. Tracy told the publication. There was already enough evidence to support her fears.

The potential benefits of what happened earlier this year with the 1940 malaria pill and no shortage of famedidine are no different, given by influential leaders ranging from President Donald Trump to CEOs. Tesla, by Elon Musk.

Business Insider met its hopes two weeks later that the drug, hydroxychloroquine, could be used to combat coronovirus, and as a result of the shortage Americans stocked, U.S. The Food and Drug Administration officially recognized the shortage. .

There is not yet peer-reviewed clinical data showing that these are chronic generic drugs that some people still take for lupus and other conditions work against COVID-19.

Michael Ree, CEO of Rx Savings Solutions, formerly a pharmacist, said, "Fear, chaos, and panic are a major threat to humanity from a virus, especially from therapy that may or may not work." The insider of the explosive drug lawsuit sparked rumors of possible treatment.

Ri advised all health workers to work professionally during these times.

"Don't be afraid set your orders," Rie said. "Just use medicine, prescribe medicine, get medicine if you really need it."

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