In cases of Trump's financial records, the Supreme Court evaluates the balance of power

In cases of Trump's financial records, the Supreme Court evaluates the balance of power
In cases of Trump's financial records, the Supreme Court evaluates the balance of power

The Supreme Court on Tuesday heard arguments in some cases involving President Trump's financial records, decisions that could have serious consequences not only for the 2020 presidential election but also for the executive branch.

Both cases include subpoenas for some of Trump's pre-presidential financial records. A pair of consolidated cases, Trump v. Mazar and Trump v. Deutsche Bank, ask whether Congress had the power to subject the President's personal record during the impeachment process? And a different case, Trump Vs. Vance addressed the New York grand jury Uppo for the same record during the criminal investigation.

In the first set of debates, judges pressured lawyers for Trump, the Justice Department, and Congress.

"At some point, there is a drop that breaks the glass," Judge Clarence Thomas said of the state of Congress. "At some point, it weakens the president."

But Judge Neil Gorsuch asked: "Why shouldn't we avoid the House's opinion on our own legislative objectives?"

Judge Brett Kavanuagh asked, "We both need to get information to protect the interests of the House, how is it required to legislate, but also protect the presidency?"

In the second set of arguments, including the New York grand jury Uppo, the judges rejected arguments made by the president's lawyer, Jay Sekulow, that the president cannot be investigated while in office.

That argument, Judge Elena Kagan said, "is a fundamental example of our constitutional order that the president is not above the law."

The lower courts ruled against Trump in all cases to appeal the president's personal lawyers to the Supreme Court. In June, it has been decided to take the presidential campaign forward at a fast pace.

Due to measures of social unrest amid the outbreak of coronovirus, the judges participated by teleconference and the arguments were broadcast live. Here is a summary of all the cases that the judges heard this week and last week.

The closing debate started at 10 am on Wednesday. Includes a case about ET and Electoral College.

Post a Comment

0 Comments