Scientific advisors say that England has risked revival of COVID-19 by ending the blockade soon

Scientific advisors say that England has risked revival of COVID-19 by ending the blockade soon
Scientific advisors say that England has risked revival of COVID-19 by ending the blockade soon

England is in danger of losing control of the coronavirus epidemic again and when it begins to emerge from the COVID-19 blockade, it is a very dangerous moment, senior scientists and medical advisors warned on Saturday.

One of the slowest countries, the UK is now one of the hardest hit and is beginning to take temporary steps to reopen parts of the economy with the help of recently launched track and trace systems. the outbreak.

Starting Monday, six people in England will be able to gather outside their homes, some school classes will resume and can be resumed without elite competitive sports fans.

But four members of Britain's Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) called the rebellion premature, saying the tracking and tracing system had not been tested and was unlikely to deal with the charges. Infection of approximately 8,000 new cases per day.

John Edmonds of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and a member of the SAGE said the waiver was risky.

"Track and Trace was already released yesterday," he told Sky News, so we can't be sure that it will work effectively, and even then we'll go ahead and make these changes. "" I think it's quite dangerous. "

Keeping up with the infection rate at its current level, he said many more cases would lead to more deaths. Three other SAGE members and London Mayor Sadiq Khan also expressed concern.

If you allow it, it gets out of hand very quickly, and then it takes several weeks to slow down, "he said, adding the track-and-trace system will take time to go to bed and give people new orientation. K "pants break shouldn't break."

Prime Minister Boris Johnson's government, which has been widely criticized for tackling the epidemic, said a slight loosening of regulations would reduce the burden of blockade while keeping the virus's fertility rate low.

The UK has recorded more than 270,000 cases of coronovirus and says over 38,000 have died after testing positive for the disease. The Bureau of National Statistics and other data sources estimate deaths from suspected and confirmed cases at 48,000.

The government is now stuck between the need to survive the second wave and reopen the economy and keep businesses alive.

He says that while he may have made some mistakes, he is struggling with the biggest public health crisis since the outbreak of influenza of 1918 and has caused healthcare to crumble.

SAGE member Peter Horby said the next three weeks would be important. "Returning to a situation where we have lost control again is far worse than one or two (more) social measures," he said.

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