An earthquake of 7.8 magnitude strikes off the coast of Alaska

An earthquake of 7.8 magnitude strikes off the coast of Alaska
An earthquake of 7.8 magnitude struck off the coast of Alaska early Wednesday morning.

The earthquake was centered 60 miles, or 98 kilometers, southeast of the city of Perryville, Alaska, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. The earthquake is shallow at a depth of about six miles or 10 kilometers.

"Anything less than 70 km is considered a shallow earthquake," said Alison Chinchar, a meteorologist at CNN. "This is important, because shallow earthquakes often cause the most damage, compared to deeper earthquakes, regardless of their strength."

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, a tsunami warning was issued after the earthquake. The warning was in effect in southern Alaska and the Alaska Peninsula - Pacific coast from the entrance to Kennedy, Alaska (40 miles southwest of Homer) to Unimak Pass, Alaska, according to the Tsunami Warning Center.

But all tsunami warnings and advice were canceled early Wednesday morning, according to the National Weather Service.

Earthquakes are more likely to develop into a tsunami if they are high-volume, shallow, and are driven earthquakes rather than earthquakes, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. Earthquakes of magnitude 7.6 to 7.8 have the power to cause devastating waves.

There were at least 11 after shocks ranging in size from 3.9 to 6.1, according to meteorologist CNN Pedram Javaheri.

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